The Egyptian government is seen as one of the world’s most corrupt governments.

A report released this week by Transparency International, the largest anti-corruption watchdog in the world, found that the country has a national debt of more than $9 billion and is one of just two countries that have a GDP per capita of more that $100,000.

While the government’s reputation is not as bad as some other countries on the list, the country is seen by many as a lawless and authoritarian state that often acts as if it’s above the law, with citizens imprisoned without charge for up to two years.

The report, titled Egypt’s Lawless State: How It Feels to Be, says the country’s law enforcement and judicial systems have a track record of cracking down on dissent and corruption.

It says the government has been cracking down hard on dissent since 2011, when a number of demonstrators were killed after occupying Tahrir Square.

It also notes that many of those killed were protesting against the Muslim Brotherhood’s government, which has ruled Egypt since 2011.

The U.S. State Department and other U.N. bodies have called for the government to address some of the flaws in the Egyptian justice system, which critics say is deeply flawed.

While Egypt’s economy has grown substantially since the revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak in 2011, it remains heavily reliant on the sale of state assets, including oil, and the country faces serious economic problems.

According to Transparency International’s report, Egypt is one or two of the most “unstable” countries in the Middle East, where it is the second-most corrupt country in the region after the United Arab Emirates.

The country also has a high rate of unemployment, the most among any Middle Eastern country.

It is a source of concern for Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood.

The group, which is outlawed in the country, has been accused of human rights abuses, including arbitrary arrests, torture and extrajudicial killings, according to the report.

The Egyptian opposition, which was banned in 2012, has long been a key driver of change in the Muslim world, and some Egyptians who support the group see it as an important bulwark against the Islamist government.

But some in the movement are calling for the Brotherhood to be expelled.

“I think the Brotherhood is a dangerous political force that is going to become a dangerous regime in the future,” Abdel-Baki Mohamed, the deputy chairman of the Muslim Youth League, told Al Jazeera.

The government has not responded to the Transparency International report, and a spokesman for the Egyptian presidency declined to comment on the report’s findings.”

There is no reason for the opposition to be excluded.”

The government has not responded to the Transparency International report, and a spokesman for the Egyptian presidency declined to comment on the report’s findings.

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